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Flower of Dreams is an album about the ethereal poetry of dreams.

This is my third solo album and the first one I've recorded and produced entirely in my studio here in the Netherlands.

I really enjoy recording with other musicians, but this time I've taken care of all the instruments in an exercise of introspection throughout the entire work. A solitude similar to that of dreams.

In Flower of Dreams, there are nighttime dreams and daydreams, symbols, clues that are traps, traps that are doors, entrances to strange worlds that seem one thing and mean another.

Some songs emerged in English, others in Spanish. All have been recorded in their original language using an old phone as a microphone to communicate between disconnected worlds.

The sound of Flower of Dreams has been created by experimenting with effects pedals and dusty machines, over layers of synthesizers and bass guitars. Guitars have always been protagonists in my music, but this time I wanted to approach more nocturnal and dreamlike worlds by giving prominence to beats, bass, and synths.

But please listen to it and create your own worlds.

 

ALBERTO AMAR

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"I was very drawn to the sound of this Valencian artist based in the Netherlands. It's interesting when in the same track you can infer so many influences, without the song itself necessarily sounding like any of them. In "Estaré en un sueño" there's psychedelia, indie, shoegaze?, dream pop, chamber pop? Labels, after all, that guide, but are incomplete. "Styles" aside, what gives a lot of personality to the track is the idea of the title and that tone of voice, which couldn't be said to be threatening, and yet what was a small acoustic song turns into that sonic discharge... well, we start to suspect that the dream was heavier than it seemed. It's a track intriguing enough to be tempted and snooped around, to see what else is there, in Alberto's Spotify profile. There, the first track that catches attention is "Dejemos que hable Fibonacci". And it's even more intriguing, of course. Could it refer to the arpeggio sequences upon which the track is built? There seems to be a mathematical logic there (of course, this is even more explicit in the background vocals). The tracks of "The Day", on the other hand, are sung in English and more "electronic", although no less experimental ("The Real Life", my favorite), than the new single, "Estaré en un sueño". There's a lot to listen to and discover in these songs, with their moments of minimalism and their deviations towards surprising places..."

 

DANIEL FLORES,

Director ROLLING STONE magazine 

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